Scoring

Each round has lots of possibilities.  

How are you going to play that roll?

 

Sections and Categories

The scoring sheet is laid out in two sections. One is the Of-A-Kind (OAK) Section. Here scores are based on how many of each die number you can get in a single round. Do not ignore the lower numbers because they are valuable in Doker. The second section scores other poker hands like a full house or flush.  There are no card suits in this game, but some of the dice are suit colors. A flush can only be scored with all card suit (red or black) colored dice. You cannot score a flush or straight flush with all white dice. There are four-dice mini versions of flushes, straights, and straight flushes. They may not give bonuses, but they are better than a zero. Scoring values may be different than expected in some cases because of the change in difficulty due to having only six numbers versus 13 cards to choose from. The same goes for having three colors instead of four suits. For example, full houses are fairly common in Doker but not in standard Poker. Therefore, they have about the same value as a straight or flush (depending on bonuses) in Doker.  In Poker, a full house always beats a straight or flush.

OAKer

The OAKer round allows you to score a particular or related hand a second time. For example, if you already scored a three-of-a-kind in Ones and you roll another one (or 4 or 5 of-a-kind in Ones), you can score it in the OAKer row if it is still available. The size of the score and bonuses increase when scoring repeat hands. You can also use these rounds to bounce back from an earlier zero. If you took a low score in your Threes then roll four or five-of-a-kind in threes, you can score it in the OAKer row if it is still available. The OAKer round only applies to the 1-6 Of-A-Kind section. When a round is scored that qualified for a second OAKer score, you will see the an acorn to the left of the score sheet on that row.  "The humble acorn grows into a mighty OAKer bonus." That doesn't sound quite right you say, but that is how it works in Doker. Give it a try.

Joker

The Joker round also allows you to score a particular or related hand a second time. For example, if you already scored a flush and you roll another one, you can score it in the Joker row if it is still available. The size of the score and bonuses increase when scoring repeat hands Joker round. You can also use these rounds to bounce back from an earlier zero. If you took a zero in your Full House then roll another one, you can score the Full House in the joker row if it is still available. The Joker round applies to the Poker hand section. When a poker hand round is scored that qualified for a second Joker score, you will see a joker hat to the left of the score sheet on that row.  You can have the last laugh, and score a lot or points, by scoring a second poker hand in the Joker row.

Straight Flush

The straight flush is a powerful and rare hand. In Doker, it is a little easier to obtain. You can score a mini straight flush which is a straight flush with only four dice. To make it even easier, there are mixed straight flushes of 4 or 5 dice. This is a mix of red and black dice in a sequence. The bonuses are a little smaller for mixed straight flushes, but it still qualifies for a potential Joker bonus.  

High Hand

Rats! You just didn’t get the roll you were hoping for. It has happened to us all. You can score one bad round in the High Hand row. This is similar to poker when no one else had a good hand either, so no one raised the stakes. You can also score a good hand here when there is no other place to score it. Again, we assume no one raised the stakes, so the scores and bonuses will be smaller than those scored in their respective upper or lower sections. However, this can make a difference between a very good game and a great game.

Scoring

Scoring is very dynamic in Doker.  For example, there are 14 different non-zero scores possible in the Two Pair section.  There are many more in the Full House section.  That may sound complicated, but really it isn't.  In general, higher die numbers earn more points.  As above, do not ignore lower numbers in the OAK section.  They can prove to be very valuable. All of the games have a score preview available, which displays a preview of the score of the current roll. It is located to the right of the scoreboard in red text.  It will not show a preview in rows where a score has already been entered. The score preview can be very helpful to you to understand how the scoring works the various games.